THE SCIENCE BEHIND AIMING

How do we do it?

CONSISTENT AIM BETWEEN GAME AND TRAINER

We offer you a truly consistent aim between a supported game and our aim trainer, as the video on the left demonstrates.
This is accomplished by synchronizing both the in-game mouse sensitivity and the field of view of your selected game with our aim trainer. If you want to learn more about the science behind all this and the positive effects training with our aim trainer has on your aim, we invite you to continue reading.

CONSISTENT AIM FOR SUPERIOR MUSCLE MEMORY

This video clip demonstrates the result of dedicated practice by using the same consistent aim to obtain great muscle memory and eye-hand coordination.

SYNCHRONIZING MOUSE MOVEMENT BETWEEN GAME AND TRAINER

Based on your input, our trainer calculates how much distance your mouse needs to move to perform a 360 spin in the selected game. Then, our trainer will match the same distance by adapting his own in-game sensitivity (which we call look speed) so that both mouse sensitivities are perfectly synchronized, like the video demonstrates. This gives you the exact same mouse movement as in your selected game.

SYNCRONIZING FIELD OF VIEW BETWEEN GAME AND TRAINER

The field of view (FOV) defines which part of the game world you see on your screen. It is the extent of the observable 3D environment that you see on your screen at any given time and is measured as an angle in degrees. The video clip demonstrates that our aim trainer will match your preferred field of view, giving you the exact same viewing angle you experience in your game. The videos and text under “learn more” will dig deeper into this subject, explaining the visual projection and the effects on your eye-hand coordination.

SYNCHRONIZING MOUSE MOVEMENT BETWEEN DESKTOP AND TRAINER

It’s still a common misconception among gamers to think that you can fully synchronize your in-game crosshair movement with your desktop pointer movement. The first video will demonstrate that this cannot be accomplished. Click on "learn more" to learn why. The second video shows the best thing we can do to get as close as possible using what we call “reference point synchronization”. This basically means that, based on your field of view, we calculate the best point (i.e. percentage, as described in the previous paragraph) to synchronize both the 2D and 3D movement, giving you the best possible desktop match, and keeping the average deviation between 2D and 3D movement to a minimum.